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Breaking news & local stories from Camden City, Berlin, Laurel Springs and more

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    The CEO of Kenilworth-based Merck quit a White House advisory council in protest over how President Donald Trump reacted to the violence this weekend in Charlottesville.

    TRENTON -- While the CEO of New Jersey pharmaceutical giant Merck quit a White House business advisory board Monday in protest over President Donald Trump's reaction to the deadly white nationalist rally in Virginia, at least one other leader of a Garden State company is remaining on the panel. 

    Denise Morrison, the chief executive of the Camden-based Campbell Soup Company, won't step down from the American Manufacturing Council, the company said in a statement Monday.

    "The reprehensible scenes of bigotry and hatred on display in Charlottesville over the weekend have no place in our society," the company said, adding that Campbell has "long held the belief that diversity and inclusion are critical to the success of our business and our culture."

    But, the company added, "we believe it continues to be important for Campbell to have a voice and provide input on matters that will affect our industry, our company and our employees in support of growth."

    Trump attacks Merck after CEO quits president's board in protest

    There are two other CEOs of New Jersey companies on the board: Alex Gorsky of New Brunswick-based Johnson & Johnson and Michael Polk of Hoboken-based Newell Brands. 

    Neither company immediately returned messages from NJ Advance Media seeking comment Monday. 

    Kenneth Frazier, the CEO of Kenilworth-based pharmaceutical company Merck, announced early Monday he was stepping down from the council.

    Trump was heavily criticized for comments he made Saturday in the wake of the Charlottesville demonstrations, which left three people dead and 19 injured. 

    In a news conference, Trump said: "We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides. On many sides."

    But critics railed against him for not specifically calling out the white supremacists who organized the rally.

    Frazier, who is black, made his announcement via Twitter on Monday morning, saying "America's leaders must honor our fundamental values by clearly rejecting expressions of hatred, bigotry and group supremacy, which run counter to the American ideal that all people are created equal."

    Trump responded by criticizing Frazier and Merck in a tweet of his own:

    Trump addressed Charlottesville in another news conference Monday afternoon, in which he finally singled out white supremacists.

    "Racism is evil and those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans," Trump said.

    The manufacturing council is made up of 25 executives of major private companies and gives advice to the president and the U.S. secretary of commerce.

    Brent Johnson may be reached at bjohnson@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @johnsb01. Find NJ.com Politics on Facebook.


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    The cause of the crash remains under investigation

    CLEMENTON -- Five pedestrians have been struck by a vehicle in New Jersey.

    Authorities say it happened shortly before 9 p.m. Monday in Clementon, just outside of Philadelphia.

    The conditions of the victims were not immediately known.

    Authorities say the driver of the vehicle remained at the scene.

    The cause of the crash remains under investigation.

     

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    The camp is about more than just fun -- though there was plenty of that on the campers' first day.

    CAMDEN -- A summer camp going on in Camden this week is about more than just having fun -- though the campers are clearly getting plenty of it anyway.

    The ZAC Camp at the Boys & Girls Club of Camden County aims to teach kids water safety so they can be safe swimmers -- and maybe even life savers -- in the future.

    Karen and Brian Cohn of Connecticut founded The ZAC Foundation in 2008 after their son Zachary drowned when he was trapped in the suction of a pool drain, according to a statement from the organization.

    More than 200 children between the ages of five and nine are attending the camp in Camden this week.

    In addition to swim safety, they campers are learning about first aid and how to respond in a water emergency from first responders from the Gloucester Township Police Department, the Federal Bureau of Investigations, the Camden County Police Department Canine Unit, and Virtua Health Systems EMS.

    At least 27 have drowned in NJ since May

    On Monday, the first day of the camp, kids used a dummy to learn about checking vitals and applying a bandage to a wound. The day also included plenty of time in the pool, taking swimming classes.

    The foundation partners with local Boys & Girls Clubs to bring the water safety camp to 20 communities this year. Since it's inception, the foundation has educated more than 10,000 kids at the camps, according to a press release.

    Click here to see photos of the campers' first day.

    Rebecca Everett may be reached at reverett@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @rebeccajeverett. Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    The trooper allegedly had the emergency lights activated on the Maryland State Police vehicle

    An off-duty Maryland state trooper was arrested following a DUI crash Monday that injured a New Jersey woman and a 10-year-old girl, authorities said.

    Trooper First Class Tanner Nickerson was driving a marked Maryland State Police Chevrolet Tahoe north on North Bohemia Avenue in Cecilton, Md. around 9 p.m. when he rear-ended a Mercedes traveling in the same direction, Maryland State Police said in a statement.

    N.J. man who seriously hurt N.Y. trooper in crash faces charges

    The emergency lights in the State Police vehicle were turned on at the time of the collision even though the trooper was neither on duty nor responding to a call, according to officials.

    A 49-year-old Cherry Hill woman and the girl in the Mercedes were taken to a local hospital to be treated for minor injuries, officials said.

    Nickerson was charged with driving under the influence, driving while impaired, failure to control speed to avoid a collision, reckless driving and negligent driving. The six-year veteran was also suspended with pay, according to Maryland State Police. Nickerson was not hurt in the crash.

    Jeff Goldman may be reached at jeff_goldman@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @JeffSGoldman. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

     


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    There have never been more -- or tastier -- vegan eating options in New Jersey.


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    Those injured ranged in age from four to 32, police said.

    CLEMENTON -- Police said a group of people ranging in ages from four to 32 suffered injuries that are not life-threatening when they were struck by a vehicle walking on East Atlantic Avenue Monday night.

    Sgt. Robert Worrick said Tuesday that no charges have been filed. The crash is still under investigation, but he said it appeared to be accidental and there were no signs of intoxication. The driver remained on scene and cooperated, he said.

    He said the group was walking near Clementon Lake, where the road curves and has little shoulder, around 9 p.m.

    Five people in the group were taken by ambulance to hospitals but none had serious injuries, Worrick said.

    Worrick said some but not all of those injured were family members.

    Rebecca Everett may be reached at reverett@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @rebeccajeverett. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

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    Police have said the father frequents "parks, large parking lots and large shopping centers."

    GLOUCESTER TWP. -- Police are asking the public help locate a township man and his two children, all of whom were reported missing Monday.

    The Camden County prosecutor's office said in a release Tuesday that they have concerns about the safety of Raymond Reasoner III, 40, his daughter Raegan, 1, and son Raymond IV, 3. They were all reported missing from a home on Church Street in the Blackwood section of the township. 

    In a press release Tuesday, Gloucester Township police said the father is "known to frequent parks, large parking lots and large shopping centers." 

    A family member said they've been advised by authorities not to make any statements to the media.

    Police told NBC10 that a family member reported the elder Reasoner missing after he missed work two days in a row, which was uncharacteristic.

    Reasoner drives a 2013 dark tan or brown, 4-door Nissan Altima with Pennsylvania plate reading KBP7220, police said.

    Police described Reasoner as approximately 5 feet, 7 inches tall, with a slim build, blue eyes and brown hair. He was wearing a brown short sleeve shirt and blue jeans when he was last seen.

    His daughter was last seen wearing a black and white Minnie Mouse onesie. His son was last seen wearing a white, short sleeve shirt with black lettering and gray shorts, police said. Both have blue eyes and blond hair.

    No AMBER Alert has been issued. According to New Jersey State Police, AMBER Alerts are reserved in situations in which they suspect children have been abducted or are in risk of serious injury or death. The alerts are not used in most missing children or custody dispute situations, the State Police website said.

    Anyone with information about where Reasoner or his children might be is asked to call 911, the police department at 856-228-4500, or the department's anonymous tip line at 856-842-5560.

    Anonymous tips can also be sent online or by texting the tip and GLOTWPPD to 888777.

    Rebecca Everett may be reached at reverett@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @rebeccajeverett. Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    This is not hate "from many sides" as the president stated in his initial response. This is hate that is spewed by torch-bearing, racist, xenophobic bigots.

    By Louis Cappelli Jr. 

    After watching in horror the catastrophic events that took place in Charlottesville, Va., this past weekend, I believe it is imperative to state with conviction that hate has no home in Camden County.

    I want to say what President Donald Trump could not bring himself to say Saturday about white supremacists and fascists whose actions caused death and injury on that day: This nation will not accept this immoral and abhorrent behavior steeped in hatred and terrorism. In 21st century America we will not stand for this, and we must recognize that our community is stronger together than divided. 

    What we saw in Virginia was the resurgence and heightened confidence of these groups that no longer feel the need to wear a hood or hide their identities. They have found a new patriarch through the despicable campaigning and governing propaganda of Trump and aides such as Steve Bannon. 

    Saturday's events are not the "alt-right" expressing itself. The violence from their march is not "uniting the right," as its sponsors claimed. This is domestic terrorism no different than that of the Ku Klux Klan during Reconstruction. In addition, this is not hate "from many sides" as the president stated in his initial response. This is hate that is spewed by torch-bearing, racist, xenophobic, bigots from neo-Nazis and groups like the Klan.  

    Unfortunately, in our great state of New Jersey, we are far from insulated from these white supremacists and fascists. According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, six of these SPCL-identified groups reside right here in the Garden State. 

    What is more disconcerting is how emboldened these extremist groups have become. The SPLC tracked more than 900 bias-based assaults in just the first 10 days after Trump's election, and an 86 percent increase in anti-Semitic incidents in the first quarter of 2017.  

    This brings the issue home, making it even more important that we engage our neighbors and have a real dialogue about what makes our community great. It is the conversation that gets 300 people out on the streets at the drop of a hat at Cuthbert Boulevard and Haddon Avenue in Collingswood on Sunday evening, to stand in solidarity for our core principles of tolerance and love. More importantly, it is the process of not parsing words when we reject hate, intolerance and terrorism. 

    I also write this to speak on the level of public debate in our society, and the profound importance of engaging in a dialogue about hate and race not only in our county, but throughout the nation. My goal as an elected official is to raise that level of debate, so that, as a community, we may thrive and never allow white supremacists, Nazis and bigots to have the public square or undermine the ideals of freedom and tolerance ingrained in our nation.

    I believe we live in the greatest nation on earth, with a government that goes out of its way to protect the right of expression for citizens who try to destroy it -- much like we saw in Charlottestville. Masses of individuals who pledge allegiance to a Nazi agenda or a fascist ideology on a college campus are allowed to use their First Amendment rights, as heinous as their thoughts may be. 

    I also believe that democracy in its purest form will allow us to overcome this hate, no matter how flawed the practice. The triumphs of democracy over Jim Crow and segregation, and over Nazism in Europe where so many Americans sacrificed their lives, are the key to closing the door to these Neanderthals.

    Democracy has allowed us as a society to push back and defeat the policies of racism before. Now, democracy will help us unite as a community and defeat the evil forces of racism and fascism again. 

    Louis Cappelli Jr. is the freeholder board director in Camden County.

    Bookmark NJ.com/Opinion. Follow on Twitter @NJ_Opinion and find NJ.com Opinion on Facebook.


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    We asked some of the districts to explain their plans for the money.


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    Using data from the National Weather Service, we created a map that shows the cloudiness forecast for every five square miles in the United States. Watch video

    Search for your address, or click on a location on the map for more information.

    As the so-called "Great American Eclipse" draws near, the forecast for the big event is beginning to come into focus. 

    And while New Jersey will not experience 100 percent obscuration of the sun as the moon's shadow crosses the nation, viewing conditions are looking better than in much of the country. But if you're headed to the southeast, the closest region to the Garden State in which a complete eclipse will occur, you may want to cross your fingers. 

    Using tens of thousands of data points from the National Weather Service, NJ Advance Media compiled an interactive map (above) that shows what percent of the sky is expected to be obscured by clouds on the afternoon of Aug. 21. 

    23 great spots to watch the solar eclipse in N.J.: A statewide guide

    The eclipse will be visible across the United States from about 10:15 a.m. to about 4 p.m., depending on your location. In New Jersey, the eclipse will begin at 1:22 p.m., reach is maximum obscuration (about 75 percent of the sun will be covered) at 2:45 p.m. and come to an end around 4 p.m.  

    Whether you're traveling for the eclipse or just staying home, use the map above to see how the forecast for the big day evolves.

    It will be updated daily.  

    Stephen Stirling may be reached at sstirling@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @sstirling. Find him on Facebook.

     

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    In these 30 towns, homeowners pay about 7 percent of less of their household income toward property taxes.


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    The 21-year-old Clementon man was arrested and charged Tuesday.

    CLEMENTON -- A man who allegedly exchanged nude photos with an underage girl was arrested here Tuesday. 

    richard-gill-mugshot.pngRichard Gill faces charges related to manufacturing and possessing child pornography.  

    Richard Gill Jr., 21, faces charges of manufacturing and possessing child pornography, according to the Camden County Prosecutor's Office. 

    Authorities searched his Rainbow Place residence Tuesday morning, uncovering nude photographs Gill had allegedly exchanged with a juvenile girl over the internet. Electronic devices seized from his home were taken for further review, authorities said. 

    Gill was charged and taken to the Camden County Correctional Facility Tuesday, where he awaits a court hearing. 

    Amanda Hoover can be reached at ahoover@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @amahoover. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

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    Police said no charges will be filed in the case.

    GLOUCESTER TWP. -- Police said that the father and his two children who were reported missing Monday have been found safe.

    Raymond Reasoner III, 40, his daughter Raegan, 1, and son Raymond IV, 3, were all reported missing from a home on Church Street in the Blackwood section of the township Monday afternoon.

    Gloucester Township police said in a release Tuesday night that Reasoner and his children were out of the state when they were found. They didn't specify where, but noted that police in Washington, D.C. assisted in the search.

    Police said the children were safe and no charges will be filed. 

    Authorities told NBC10 that a family member reported the elder Reasoner missing after he missed work two days in a row, which was uncharacteristic. The Camden County prosecutor's office said in a release at the time that they had concerns for the family's safety, but gave no further details.

    In addition to the police in Washington, D.C., Gloucester Township police said they worked with the U.S. Marshals Regional Fugitive Task Force Camden Division, Federal Bureau of Investigations Field Offices of Philadelphia and Washington D.C., and the Camden County prosecutor's office.

    The National Center For Missing and Exploited Children and A Child Is Missing also assisted in getting the word out, police said.

    Rebecca Everett may be reached at reverett@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @rebeccajeverett. Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    The dress was soaked with red wine on the flight to her destination wedding.

    CAMDEN -- A vengeful American Airlines flight attendant "viciously" ruined a woman's wedding dress with red wine as she flew to her wedding in Jamaica, the bride claims in a new lawsuit.

    Yewande Oteh and her family are suing the airline, arguing that it failed to prevent or investigate the 2015 incident.

    Oteh claims she watched as flight attendant Melanie Masters put something into the overhead bin where her dress was stored by itself shortly after they had a heated exchange about where her gown could be stored.

    The destruction of the dress a week before the wedding derailed the celebrations, made Oteh distraught and physically sick, and "has caused a lifetime of damage," the suit says.

    Oteh, a recent law school graduate, lived in Cherry Hill at the time. Oteh's mother and the attorney representing the family in the suit, Yvette Sterling, told The Courier-Post that Oteh now lives in Boston.

    Oteh, her husband, Chidi Oteh, and their 9-month-old son were flying from Philadelphia to Jamaica, where her grandparents live, for their wedding Aug. 14, 2015. The suit says that a ticket agent at the airport told Oteh that she should carry her dress onto the plane and hang it a closet.

    But Oteh claims that when she boarded, carrying her baby and the dress in a carrier bag, and asked Masters where she could hang the dress, Masters "became indignant and agitated, and began to talk to plaintiff in a hostile aggressive way, instructing her that the closet space was not for passengers."

    As instructed, Oteh instead found a space in an empty overhead bin in first class.

    The engaged couple took their seats and Oteh watched the overhead bin carefully, "fearful that flight attendant may take out the aggression on herself, her wedding gown, or her family," according to the suit.

    At one point, she claims she witnessed Masters "open the bin with her right hand, while something was occupying her left hand" that Oteh couldn't identify. Later in the flight, Masters and another flight attendant again opened the bin holding the dress, the suit says.

    When they landed, the couple was dismayed to find that the dress was soaked through with what they later determined was red wine, according to the suit.

    There was no bottle or other source of the wine in the compartment and they were sure that no one had accessed the overhead bin other than Masters. They sought out airport police, who they said stopped the plane as it was departing and questioned the flight staff. The suit does not say what became of that investigation.

    The lawsuit says Oteh was so stressed by the loss of the dress, which could not be cleaned before the wedding, if at all, that she was sick and missed some of the wedding activities that week.

    She said she also spent hours looking for a new dress in Jamaica before her sister flew back to Florida and bought several for her to choose from.

    "Plaintiff failed to enjoy the wedding as she was in a dress that was not the one she spent months looking for," Sterling wrote in the lawsuit.

    The family claims that American Airlines didn't properly investigate the complaints filed against Masters and denied wrongdoing. Asked to respond, a spokesperson for the airline said only that it was reviewing the lawsuit.

    The family is seeking damages as well as costs and fees, claiming the airline was negligent and intentionally inflicted emotional distress and caused Oteh "physical and mental injuries."

    The suit also names as a defendant US Airways Group, which merged with after the incident in 2015. Masters is not named as a defendant.

    Rebecca Everett may be reached at reverett@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @rebeccajeverett. Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    The president's reversal on the neo-Nazi protest in Charlotte has cost him more high-profile business leaders from the Garden State. Watch video

    TRENTON -- President Donald Trump on Wednesday disbanded his business advisory panels as CEOs -- including two more from New Jersey -- announced they were leaving following his comments about the deadly neo-Nazi rally in in Charlottesville, Va..

    Trump said on Twitter at 1:15 p.m. that "rather than putting pressure on the businesspeople of the Manufacturing Council & Strategy & Policy Forum, I am ending both. Thank you all!"

    Just an hour earlier, Denise Morrison, the CEO of Camden-based Campbell Soup Company, reversed herself and announced that she would quit the White House Manufacturing Advisory Council.

    In a statement released to media shortly before 1 p.m. Wednesday, Morrison explained that "racism and murder are unequivocally reprehensible and are not morally equivalent to anything else that happened in Charlottesville" adding that "I believe the President should have been -- and still needs to be -- unambiguous on that point."

    Minutes later, Alex Gorsky, the CEO of New Brunswick-based Johnson & Johnson, followed suit with a similar argument.

    Gorsky wrote that "equating those who are motivated by race-based hate with those who stand up against hatred is unacceptable and has changed our decision to participate in the White House Manufacturing Advisory Council."

    Late Tuesday afternoon, Trump seemed to distance himself from an earlier statement laying blame for the violence on Ku Klux Klan members, white supremecists and neo-Nazis whose violent Saturday rally in Charlottesville claimed the life of one woman and injured dozens.

    Speaking at Trump Tower in New York City, the president on Tuesday evening said he thought there was blame "on both sides," and blasted the media for maligning "some fine people" attending the white nationalist rally who were not neo-Nazis.

    On Tuesday, Campbell said Morrison planned to remain on the advisory council just as the CEO of the New Jersey-based Merck Pharmaceuticals, Kenneth Frazier, stepped down along with the chief executives of microprocessor giant Intel and athletic apparel maker UnderArmor.

    On Tuesday, the company said Morrison's decision to stay on despite the president's muted and at times contradictory responses to the deadly racial violence was because it was "important for Campbell to have a voice and provide input on matters that will affect our industry, our company, and our employees in support of growth."

    But following Tuesday evening claim that it was "entirely correct" to blame both sides for the Charlottesville car attack that killed a 32 year old counter-protestor, Morrisson had enough.

    "I cannot remain on the Manufacturing Jobs Initiative," she wrote. "I will continue to support all efforts to spur economic growth and advocate for the values that have always made America great."

    The president's move to disband the advisory panels move is a sharp reversal from a boast he'd made just 24 hours earlier in which he claimed to have enough relationships with the U.S. business community to weather the CEO departures.

    But the stampede may have proven more than the president could handle.

    On Wednesday morning, Inge Thulin, the chairman and chief executive of 3M resigned from a White House advisory panel.

    And on Tuesday, AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka and Alliance for American Manufacturing head Scott Paul had also quit the White House panel, joining with the heads of companies like UnderArmor and Merck, who'd left earlier.

    By mid-day Wednesday, it was clear that the CEOs were in open revolt.

    In a statement Wednesday, members of the White House Strategic and Policy Forum -- which included some of the biggest names in business like JPMorganChase CEO Jamie Dimon, PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi, General Motors CEO Mary Barra and Walmart CEO Doug McMillion -- made clear they wouldn't be sticking around.

    In a statement released Wednesday, the group wrote that the controversy swirling around the White House forum "has become a distraction from our well-intentioned and sincere desire to aid vital policy discussions on how to improve the lives of everyday Americans. As such, the President and we are disbanding the Forum."

    On Wednesday afternoon, JPMorganChase CEO Jamie Dimon tweeted that he could no longer serve the White House forum, and strongly criticized the president's reaction to the Charlottesville violence.

    NJ Advance Media staff writer Brent Johnson and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

    Claude Brodesser-Akner may be reached at cbrodesser@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @ClaudeBrodesser. Find NJ.com Politics on Facebook.


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    CAMDEN -- A Pennsylvania man was sentenced to 90 months in prison for trafficking more than 20 firearms into Camden, the U.S. Attorney's Office said. Darnel Johns, 49, of Albrightsville, brought more than 20 weapons including assault rifles and a sawed-off shotgun into Camden for sale in late 2014 with the help of a city man, David Potts, 45. Many...

    CAMDEN -- A Pennsylvania man was sentenced to 90 months in prison for trafficking more than 20 firearms into Camden, the U.S. Attorney's Office said.

    Darnel Johns, 49, of Albrightsville, brought more than 20 weapons including assault rifles and a sawed-off shotgun into Camden for sale in late 2014 with the help of a city man, David Potts, 45. Many of the weapons were stolen or had defaced serial numbers.

    Johns was also sentenced to three years of supervised release. Potts began serving a 10-year sentence in April.

     

     

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    The Great American Solar Eclipse of 2017 will happen Monday, August 21 (8/21/2017). Use this eclipse map when it's time for you get your viewing glasses and watch the celestial phenomenon. The path of the solar eclipse is one thing, but this map shows anticipated local cloud cover for the entire United States.

    Click on a location on the map for more information when it's time to view the solar eclipse of 2017. Our eclipse viewing map was last updated at 12 p.m., Aug. 17. 

    The Great American Eclipse is just five days away, and for much of the country the forecast for the solar eclipse is looking good.  

    The Garden State won't see a complete solar eclipse during the Monday event, though it is shaping up to be one of the best places to watch the celestial phenomenon. At this point, the southeast looks to be one of the most likely places where the complete obscuration of the sun will also be obscured by clouds. But a lot can change between now and when it's time to view the eclipse.

    23 great spots to see eclipse in N.J.

    Using tens of thousands of data points from the National Weather Service, NJ Advance Media compiled an interactive eclipse viewing map (above) that shows what percent of the sky is expected to be obscured by clouds on the afternoon of Monday, Aug. 21.

    The eclipse will be visible across the United States from about 10:15 a.m. to about 4 p.m., depending on your location. In New Jersey, the eclipse will begin at 1:22 p.m., reach is maximum obscuration (about 75 percent of the sun will be covered) at 2:45 p.m. and come to an end around 4 p.m.

    Whether you're traveling for the eclipse or just staying home, use the map above to see how the forecast for the big day evolves.

    Stephen Stirling may be reached at sstirling@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @sstirling. Find him on Facebook.

     

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    Climb aboard for a look at fun places from the past.

    The National Amusement Park Historical Association has a listing of "Lost Amusement Parks in New Jersey" containing more than 50 parks that once existed in New Jersey but are now simply fond memories.

    Some -- such as Bergen County's Palisades Amusement Park, which closed in 1971 -- were known statewide; others were not renowned.

    The site notes, for example, that Arcola Park in Rochelle Park operated from 1926 to 1929, and "the entire park burned in a fire except the pool," which makes quite a bit of sense when you think about it. A fire destroyed part of Riverview Beach Park in Pennsville in 1966, leading to its closing, and Island Beach Park in Burlington suffered two fires in 1928 and 1934 that led to its demise.

    MORE: Vintage photos around New Jersey

    Fires at these parks usually centered on roller coasters, built of wood; the first all-steel roller coasters didn't start appearing until the 1950s.

    The most commonly cited reasons for parks closing, however, were automobiles and highways. With the opening of the Garden State Parkway and New Jersey Turnpike, it became easier for vacationers to travel to shore points that offered amusement parks; smaller local parks couldn't survive the loss of revenue in a business that only brought in income part of the year.

    Here's a gallery of places we went for rides and fun in New Jersey. Don't see one you're thinking of? You'll most likely find it in one of these other galleries:

    Vintage photos of amusement parks, circuses and fairs in N.J.

    Vintage photos of amusement parks, fairs and circuses in N.J.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    Eleven of the New Jersey's 21 counties said one of their largest employers is a hospital.


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    Authorities say he also convinced the girl to send sexually explicit photos and videos.

    CAMDEN -- Police have arrested a Monmouth County man they said spent two months luring a 12-year-old girl he met online, eventually sexually assaulting her in Merchantville.

    Anthony M. Woods, 20, of West Long Branch, is facing 22 charges ranging from sexual assault to endangering the welfare of a child. He was arrested Tuesday when investigators executed a search warrant at his home, according to a press release from the Camden County prosecutor's office.

    The crimes allegedly occurred between May 1 and July 1, the release said.

    The prosecutor's office said that after meeting the Cherry Hill girl online, Woods convinced her to exchange sexually explicit photographs and videos with him.

    When she gave him her home address, he picked her up there and took her to Merchantville, where he sexually assaulted her, according to authorities.

    Police did not say where specifically the assault is alleged to have taken place, but did say that investigators searched and then seized his vehicle as evidence.

    Also seized with a search warrant Tuesday were electronic devices from Wood's home. They will be analyzed by the prosecutor's office.

    After his arrest, Woods was sent to the Camden County Correctional Facility. The prosecution plans to ask that he be held without bail, so a detention hearing is expected soon, the release said.

    Assisting the prosecutor's office in the arrest and investigation were the Monmouth County prosecutor's office and police from Cherry hill, Merchantville and West Long Branch, according to the release.

    Rebecca Everett may be reached at reverett@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @rebeccajeverett. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

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