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Breaking news & local stories from Camden City, Berlin, Laurel Springs and more

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    Jonathan Taylor is at Wisconsin, and Camden has a pair of players at Michigan but they are both strong sectional contenders.

    Jonathan Taylor is at Wisconsin, and Camden has a pair of players at Michigan but they are both strong sectional contenders.


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    Your A-to-Z guide for the playoff's top storylines


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    Find out which teams have left a stamp on the state tournament so far.


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    Who are the players to watch in the sectional finals?


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    All the coverage in one spot.

    ESSENTIALS
    Football state playoffs first-round schedule/scoreboard
    Thursday's crossover-game results and links
    Final statewide conference football standings
    • Season stat leaders  
    Full schedule of 2017 NJSIAA regional crossover games
    Statewide stat leaders for Week 9 of the HS football season
    2017 NJSIAA football state tournament brackets

    RANKINGS
    • Top 20
    • Group and conference 

    COMPLETE: Bracket-by-bracket previews


    PICKS 
    Top 20 Round 1 picks & schedule
    NJ.com's picks for every football tourney quarterfinal

    MUST-READ CONTENT 
    From Asbury Park to zero-win teams: A-to-Z guide to the playoffs
    • 'It's unique, it's weird': NJSIAA crossover matchup has 3 teams confused
    Football playoffs, 2017: Bracket-by-bracket previews
    Dark horse dreams: 19 low seeds who could make deep runs in football playoffs
    NJSIAA punishes St. Joseph (Mont.) for player-poaching activities against Don Bosco
    Lawrence, riding late momentum, faces top seed Rumson-Fair Haven in Central 3 opener
    Can't-miss football playoffs: The 23 best Round 1 games
    Despite losing some of the best players in school history, Camden and Salem remain contender
    Vineland-Lenape promises to be a first-round heavyweight fight
    Can Nottingham stop Freehold Borough's Ashante Worthy?
    Legendary New Providence football coach dies

    The 31 best football players from Week 9, as teams jockeyed for playoff slots
    'Dismayed': Fired Verona football coach answers in response to BOE statement
    North Hunterdon, Voorhees football seeking to make post-season history
    Refs who walked off in protest after anthem kneeling will not work playoffs
    WATCH: Winslow football coach suspended for head slap to player, caught on video

    GAMES OF THE WEEK 
    Bergenfield at Sparta voted NJ.com/Star-Ledger Game of the Week for Week 10
    Gateway hosts playoff game for first time against Woodstown
    Allentown-Brick Township finals rematch on tap for quarterfinals

    RECRUITING  
    Former Rutgers football commit Amad Anderson picks the Purdue Boilermakers
    Which N.J. football recruits has Penn State prioritized?
    Rutgers' newest commit Jaaron Hayek to help fellow pledge Zamar Wise recruit for 2019
    N.J. WR Kevin Johnson, teammate of Artur Sitkowski, earns 1st FBS offer, has RU interest
    Jaaron Hayek joins big brothers Tyler and Hunter in committing to Rutgers football
    Rutgers football recruits react to close win over Maryland

    Jeremy Schneider may be reached at jschneider@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @J_Schneider. Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    Your one-stop shop for playoff coverage

    ESSENTIALS 
    •  Brackets for all 23 sections  
    Round 1 mega-coverage guide 
    Picks for all Round 1 games 
    • Picks for teams in the NJ.com Top 20

    PLAYOFF PREVIEWS
    Bracket-by-bracket previews  
    • An A-to-Z guide to the playoffs
    • Predicting all 23 sectional champions
    • Dark horses:19 dangerous low seeds
    35 players worth the price of admission 

    FRIDAY'S FEATURED COVERAGE 
    No. 10 Lenape 35, No. 19 Vineland 0  
    Look back at live updates
    Indians rise to challenge
    •  Photo gallery
    Box score

    Mount Olive 36, Morris Knolls 0 
    Cold climes don't slow MO
    •  Photo gallery
     Look back at live updates
    Box score

    Newton 21, Pequannock 19  
    Look back at live updates

     Game story
    • Box score

    Hasbrouck Heights 12, Cedar Grove 6, OT 
    Look back at live updates

     Game story
    •  Photo gallery
    • Box score

    Sayreville 31, Colonia 0 
    Look back at live updates

     Game story
    •  Photo gallery
    • Box score 

    Manasquan 41, Roselle 8 
    Look back at live updates
     Game story
    •  Photo gallery
    • Box score 

    Brick Township 28, Allentown 0
    • Cole Groschel does it all
    •  Photo gallery
     Look back at live updates
    Box score

    Gateway 28, Woodstown 8
    Look back at live updates
     Game story
    • 
    Photo gallery
    • Box score

    North Hunterdon 26, Orange 9 
     Game story
    •  Photo gallery
    • Box score 

    Freehold Township 17, North Brunswick 13 
     Game story
    • Box score

    Hackettstown 35, Mountain Lakes 7 
     Game story
    • Box score

    Old Bridge 24, Trenton 6  
     Game story
    •  Photo gallery
    • Box score 

    Bound Brook 40, Florence 24
     Game story
    • Box score

    West Deptford 51, Pleasantville 12
     Game story
    •  Photo gallery
    • Box score

    Delsea 56, Ocean City 34 
     Game story
    • Box score

    No. 5 Millville 20, Williamstown 14, OT 
     Game story
    • Box score

    FRIDAY'S TOP 20 SCOREBOARD 
    No. 4 Timber Creek vs. Seneca, 7
    No. 5 Millville 20, Williamstown 14, OT
    No. 6 Manalapan vs. Perth Amboy, 7
    No. 10 Lenape 35, No. 19 Vineland 0
    No. 12 Old Tappan 46, Teaneck 7
    No. 13 Phillipsburg 48, Millburn 14
    No. 14 St. John Vianney vs. Camden Catholic, 7
    No. 16 Holy Spirit vs. Gloucester Catholic, 7
    No. 17 Rancocas Valley vs. Eastern, 7
    No. 20 Passaic Tech vs. Bloomfield, 7

    SATURDAY'S FEATURED COVERAGE 
    St. Augustine at No. 1 Bergen Catholic, 1
    • Live updates
    • Box score

    Don Bosco Prep at No. 2 St. Peter's Prep, 12
    Live updates
    • Box score
    •  Photo gallery

    Bergenfield at Sparta, 1 
    Live updates
    • Box score
    •  Photo gallery

    Hillside at South River, 1
    Live updates
    • Box score
    •  Photo gallery

    Lakewood at Lacey, 1 
    • Live updates
    • Box score
    •  Photo gallery

    Willingboro at Cedar Creek, 1 
    • Live updates
    • Box score
    •  Photo gallery

    Schalick at Penns Grove, 1
    • Box score
    Photo gallery

    Woodbury at Salem, 1
    • Box score

    Roselle Park at Glen Ridge, 1 
    • Box score

    Wall at Steinert, 1 
    • Box score
    •  Photo gallery

    Freehold Borough at Nottingham 
    • Box score
    •  Photo gallery

    SATURDAY'S TOP 20 SCOREBOARD
    No. 1 Bergen Catholic vs. St. Augustine, 1
    No. 2 St. Peter's Prep vs. Don Bosco Prep, 12
    No. 3 St. Joseph (Mont.) vs. Red Bank Catholic, 1
    No. 8 Montclair vs, Livingston, 1
    No. 9 Pope John vs. Donovan Catholic, 1
    No. 11 Westfield vs. Ridge, 1
    No. 15 St. Joseph (Hamm.) vs. St. Mary (Ruth.), 1

    PLAYOFF SCOREBOARDS
    Non-Public, Group 4 

    Non-Public, Group 3  

    Non-Public, Group 2 

    North Jersey, Section 1, Group 5

    North Jersey, Section 1, Group 4 

    North Jersey, Section 1, Group 3 

    North Jersey, Section 1, Group 2 

    North Jersey, Section 1, Group 1 

    North Jersey, Section 2, Group 5 

    North Jersey, Section 2, Group 4 

    North Jersey, Section 2, Group 3 

    North Jersey, Section 2, Group 2 

    North Jersey, Section 2, Group 1 

    Central Jersey, Group 5 

    Central Jersey, Group 4 

    Central Jersey, Group 3 

    Central Jersey, Group 2 

    Central Jersey, Group 1 

    South Jersey, Group 5 

    South Jersey, Group 4 

    South Jersey, Group 3 

    South Jersey, Group 2 

    South Jersey, Group 1 


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    Highlights of the opening weekend of the playoffs


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    Five games are up for vote.

    Five games are up for vote.


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    JaQue McKenney, 13, and Chyna Monae Jones, 18, were reported missing from their homes, which are less than a mile apart, authorities said.

    CAMDEN -- County police are asking for the public's help in locating two missing teenagers from the city's Centerville neighborhood.

    JaQue McKenney, 13, and Chyna Monae Jones, 18, were reported missing separately from their homes, which are less than a mile apart, authorities said Sunday.

    McKenney was reported missing from his home in the 2000 block of Kossuth Street. He is known to frequent Centerville and Woodlynne, police said. 

    He was described by police as a black teenager who stands at 5-foot-3-inches tall and weighs 120 pounds, with brown eyes and brown hair. He was last seen wearing a blue vest, blue jeans, blue sweatshirt and blue Nike sneakers, and was carrying a blue gym bag. 

    Jones was reported missing from her home in the 2000 block of Ferry Avenue. She may be headed to Uniontown, Pa., police said. 

    She was described by authorities as a black teenager who stands at 5-foot-2-inches tall and weighs 125 pounds, with brown eyes and black hair. She was last seen wearing green sweatpants and a green sweatshirt. 

    Authorities are asking anyone with information about either of their whereabouts to call police at 856-757-7042.

    Luke Nozicka may be reached at lnozicka@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @lukenozicka

    Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    Homeless animals throughout New Jersey await adoption in shelters and rescues.

    Some notes on homeless animals in New Jersey:

    * According to the State of New Jersey Office of Animal Welfare, "it is estimated that the number of free-roaming cats in the United States may be equal to that of owned cats, approximately 70 million. If left unchecked, free-roaming cats will breed and their populations increase at locations where they find suitable shelter and food." The office goes on to note that pet cats that are abandoned will not easily fend for themselves outdoors. Unfortunately, most of these cats and their offspring will suffer premature death from disease, starvation or trauma.

    * Among shelters and rescue groups around New Jersey, the top 10 reasons for owners relinquishing a dog are: (1) moving; (2) landlord issues (3) cost of pet maintenance; (4) "no time for pet;" (5) inadequate facilities; (6) "too many pets in home;" (7) pet illness; (8) "personal problems;" (9) biting; and (10) no homes for litter-mates.

    Other interesting facts from the Office of Animal Welfare:

    * As many as 25 percent of dogs entering shelters across the country each year are purebreds.

    * One unspayed female cat and her unaltered offspring can produce 420,000 cats in seven years.

    Here is a gallery of homeless animals from northern and central New Jersey. Consider visiting a local shelter or contacting a local rescue group when looking for a pet for your family.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    Which teams broke into the NJ.com Top 20 this week?


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    The Cooper House opened in 2016 after the county spent $2.9 million to renovate the riverfront spot.

    PENNSAUKEN -- Days after the Cooper House restaurant closed its doors on the banks of the Cooper River, the county announced Monday that the space will soon hold another "top flight" eatery.

    The LaScala Restaurant Group of Cherry Hill will launch a casual Italian restaurant in the county-owned space in Cooper River Park as early as December, the county said.

    "This will be the perfect place to enjoy a meal along the river, or to have a relaxing dinner with an incredible sunset as a backdrop," Freeholder Jeffrey Nash said of the plans. "This restaurant will quickly become Cooper River Park's destination within a destination."

    County officials made similar statements about the Cooper House a year and a half ago, when the restaurant had its grand opening in the building the county spent $2.9 million to renovate.

    The plan was to upgrade the space that formerly held the Lobster Trap to create a more upscale, family restaurant with outdoor seating and other renovations to take advantage of the view. The building, known as the Hadley House, was built as a tennis clubhouse in 1937 through President Franklin Roosevelt's Works Progress Administration.

    LaScala Restaurant Group will be taking over the lease from KTMK Group, which operated the Cooper House in the 6,572 square-foot building. The lease, which nets the county $5,000 a month plus a percentage of sales, has another two years on it.

    Kevin Meeker, owner of Keg & Kitchen in Haddon Township, was one of the partners in KTMK Group when the project got off the ground. Reached Monday, he said he left the group about a year ago.

    Meeker doesn't know what led to the closing, but said the remaining partner was doing his best to "make a go of it."

    Meeker declined to name him, but a county spokesman said Mike DeBenedictis was running the Cooper House.

    "There are a lot of positives but some negatives," Meeker said of the location. "I've owned 12 restaurants and I do what I want with them. It was difficult for me to work under the constraints" set by the county.

    While the county later relaxed the rules, Meeker said that they at first included things like no bar stools allowed at the bar, no televisions and no catering. He also said the restaurant's visibility is poor at night due to the lighting and signage.

    The benefits of the 5300 North Park Drive location touted by the county include the views, as well as the park's draw for walkers, bikers, families and rowers. The nearby Cooper River Boathouse frequently hosts large regattas on the river.

    The space is currently undergoing minor renovations and "rebranding," the county said, but those visiting the park could be able to have a meal in the new restaurant by early December.  The menu will include "creative pizza, artisan Italian food and world beers," according to the press release.

    "This is a great opportunity for us to offer some amazing food in a truly one-of-a-kind setting," said Rob LaScala. "We are enthusiastic to be a part of the excitement taking place in Cooper River Park and being able to provide top-flight service to the thousands of visitors."

    A message left for the LaScala Restaurant Group was not returned Monday afternoon. The group has run restaurants in Philadelphia and South Jersey since 1991, the county said, including LaScala Fire in Marlton. It is also listed as one of the caterers for events at the nearby Camden County Boathouse.

    Any gift cards or parties booked with the Cooper House will be honored by La Scala once the unnamed restaurant opens its doors.

    Anyone with questions about previous bookings can call (856) 795-0007.

    Rebecca Everett may be reached at reverett@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @rebeccajeverett. Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    The idea is it's much easier for someone to deal with health or addiction issues if they have a home.

    MAGNOLIA -- Step inside the second-story apartment of Miguel Rodriguez, 55, and you'll find a spotless, tastefully-furnished home with minimal decorations but a few treasured mementos. There's a view of youth baseball fields from the glass sliding door in his living room.

    It's a nice one-bedroom apartment by most standards, but for Rodriguez, it met his number one condition: it wasn't in Camden, where there were too many reminders of his decades as a heroin addict.

    "I said, 'oh yeah, this is nice,'" Rodriguez said, looking around his living room as he recalled first seeing the apartment two years ago. "It's clean, no drugs, quiet."

    He looked healthy and at home on the couch in an interview earlier this month, but not so long ago, he was living on the streets of Camden -- except for when he was repeatedly admitted to the hospital for symptoms related to his chronic health problems.

    But about four years ago, representatives from the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers found him in the hospital and offered to help him better manage his health problems, with the first step being getting him off the streets and into drug treatment.

    Now, he's a success story for the coalition and its partners, who are celebrating the second anniversary of their collaborative Housing First program.

    Laura Buckley, who coordinates the program, said the idea behind it is simple: People can better focus on getting healthy and happy if they're not looking for shelter or their next meal. Plus, there are logistical challenges, Buckley said, like a diabetic who can't use insulin because he has no way to refrigerate it.

    For Rodriguez, it means he is able to take better care of his emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and mental health.

    "It's changed me and taught me to value what I have," he said of getting the keys to his home. "When I was in addiction, I gave everything up... My wife, everything. Having this here, knowing that I don't have to give it away, I make it my priority. My addiction now is keeping this roof over my head."

    First rolled out in Utah, the program aims to identify people who are chronically homeless and get them quickly into apartments that are mostly paid for by vouchers from the state.

    The program in Camden is coordinated by the coalition, but a collaboration between South Jersey Behavioral Health Resources, Volunteers of America--Delaware Valley, Saint Joseph's Carpenter Society, OAKS Integrated Care, and Corporation for Supportive Housing.

    The first beneficiaries of Camden County's pilot program were moving into apartments in November of 2015, Buckley said. Now, the 41 people currently in the program have reduced their hospital utilization by 63 percent.

    "We run that overall utilization number about every three months and that number has steadily improved," Buckley said. "The first time we ran the number it was, I think, a 40 percent reduction."

    The Housing First model is gaining traction in New Jersey. Organizations in Bergen and Mercer counties adopted it before Camden County did, and the Cumberland County Housing First Collaborative housed its first few residents in June.

    This summer, Gov. Chris Christie announced that the state Department of Community Affairs is expanding its support for the initiatives by providing a total of 425 vouchers for the chronically homeless, plus 25 more for homeless veterans, at an annual estimated cost of $5.4 million.

    'Enough is enough'

    Rodiguez said he was nine when he learned to do heroin from his mother.

    He sold drugs on the street, then got clean but kept selling, then started using again, he said. "In 2007 my wife left me. I hit rock bottom. I was using every day, he said.

    After getting out of jail in 2012, he had nowhere to live, overdosed twice, and needed bypass surgery because of a clogged artery, he said.

    On two of his many hospital stays, caseworkers from the Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers approached him, offering to help him deal with his chronic health problems. He never followed-through.

    Then, the third time he was readmitted, something changed.

    "I was lying in my room in the hospital and asking God to send them back to me. At that point in my life, enough is enough," he said. "Then it was them coming through the door."

    The coalition worked with Volunteers of America to get him into a transitional housing program where he spent his days in treatment programs. 

    He was able to get his own apartment in Lawnside for 15 months, but eventually had to move in with his daughter. He knew he needed his own place, he said, but his only income was a $766.25 supplemental security income check.

    That's when the coalition was starting its Housing First program.

    How it works

    The program is for the chronically homeless, defined as a person with a disabling condition who has been homeless for at least a year or had four episodes of homelessness over the past four years.

    To qualify for vouchers, they must have been hospitalized at least twice in six months and have two or more chronic health conditions.

    The coalition identifies those who might qualify by looking at hospital visit data through the Camden Health Information Exchange, which shares information among Camden hospitals. She said workers know to look for certain "clues" that someone is homeless, like no address or an address that is a shelter.

    "We engage people and if they are homeless we see if they meet the definition of chronically homeless, and then they're eligible," she said.

    Volunteers of America works to find landlords willing to rent to people with criminal records or other issues, which Rodriguez said was a problem for him. For some landlords, it helps to know that caseworkers are checking up on the residents and can sometimes act as go-betweens.

    After choosing one of the available apartments, the residents pay 30 percent of their monthly income toward rent, and the state pays the rest. Nine of the 41 residents in the program don't have any income and so pay nothing, Buckley said.

    The vouchers can only be used for units with rents up to $1,003, she said, but some of the one-bedroom apartments are as little as $650.

    While they're in the voucher program, Buckley said, South Jersey Behavioral Health Resources has a long-term, "wrap-around care team" that helps the residents work to achieve their health goals.

    Buckley said that as their physical and mental health issues are handled, the residents can focus on goals like increasing their income, reconnecting with family or integrating back into their communities -- things that are hard to do while homeless.

    For Rodriguez, his new focus has become helping others. He has been running groups at recovery or mental health centers, including a new COPD support group.

    He learned how rewarding it could be to help people by getting to know his helpers from the coalition, he said. "We talked all the time and they kept me strong, kept me focused. They said keep doing what you're doing," he said.

    While expanding the program could be a goal some day, Buckley said the coalition and its partners are focusing now on getting the last nine vouchers out to the people that need them. A lot of work goes into getting each resident settled, and it doesn't end there.

    Residents are asked to do interviews and surveys to give feedback on how the program worked for them, and Buckley said they've learned a lot already.

    "There's a lot more learning to be had," she said. "These are 15-year vouchers and we're only two years in."

    Rebecca Everett may be reached at reverett@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @rebeccajeverett. Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    The OUTstanding list celebrates LGBT executives and allies who are successful in their careers and create workplaces for LGBT people.

    CAMDEN -- Denise Morrison, CEO of Campbell Soup Company, has been named at the top of the OUTstanding Ally Executives List from Financial Times for her continued support of the LGBT community. 

    Since 2013, the OUTstanding lists have been celebrating those LGBT executives and allies who are not only successful in their careers, but are also creating supportive workplaces for other LGBT people - and Morrison's efforts have not gone unnoticed.

    She is one of 150 CEOs who signed on to the CEO Action for Diversity & Inclusion, the largest CEO-driven business commitment to advance diversity and inclusion in the workplace. Additionally, for eight consecutive years, Campbell has received a perfect score on the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) Foundation's annual Corporate Equality Index and earned a spot on the HRC's 2017 Buying Guide for Equality.

    "Think outside the can," Morrison said in the Financial Times article. "It is clear consumers are changing . . . their wants are changing, the family structure is different. The newer, truer picture of the US household . . . is more likely to be a mosaic in different configurations."

    Have community news you'd like to share? Send an email to sjtowns@njadvancemedia.com. Have an event happening you want to share? Go to nj.com/events to submit your information to be included in a community calendar. 


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    NJ.com football writers selected the top individual performances from the quarterfinal-round of the state football playoffs


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    Vote now for your favorite South Jersey bakery in our N.J.'s best bakery showdown.

    South Jersey has won two of our N.J.'s best showdowns - best Italian restaurant and best bar. How will it fare in our epic N.J.'s best bakery competition?

    You can vote for your favorite bakery starting right now. You can vote once in each category per day.  Deadline for voting is 11:59 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 19.

    The top five vote-getters in each region. plus my 26 picks, will comprise our 50 semifinalists, which I will visit starting Wednesday, Nov. 22.

    Don't forget to vote in our other categories:

    North Jersey

    Central Jersey

    Jersey Shore


    Peter Genovese may be reached at pgenovese@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter at @PeteGenovese or via The Munchmobile @NJ_Munchmobile. Find the Munchmobile on Facebook and Instagram.


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    NJ Advance Media takes a look at who will move on and who will win state titles.

    TUESDAY, NOV. 14

    GROUP 1 SEMIFINALS
    Mountain Lakes vs. Glen Ridge, 5 p.m.
    At Indian Hills
    Preview
    Bracket

    Shore vs. Pitman, 5 p.m.
    At Paul VI

    • Preview
    Bracket

    GROUP 2 SEMIFINALS
    Westwood vs. Hanover Park, 5 p.m.
    At Ridge
    Preview
    Bracket

    Wall vs. Cinnaminson, 5 p.m.
    At Hopewell Valley
    Preview
    Bracket

    GROUP 3 SEMIFINALS
    Northern Highlands vs. Middletown South, 5 p.m.
    At Livingston
    Preview
    Bracket

    Allentown vs. Ocean City, 5 p.m.
    At Toms River North
    Preview
    Bracket

    GROUP 4 SEMIFINALS
    Morris Knolls vs. Ridge, 5 p.m.
    At Franklin
    Preview
    Bracket

    Freehold Township vs. Washington Township, 5 p.m.
    At Rowan University
    Preview
    Bracket

    SUNDAY, NOV. 12

    NON-PUBLIC A FINAL
    Bishop Eustace vs. Immaculate Heart, 12:30 p.m.

    At Kean University
     Preview
     Bracket

    NON-PUBLIC A FINAL
    Montclair Kimberley vs. Moorsestown Friends, 5:30 p.m.
    At Kean University
     Preview
     Bracket

    Brandon Gould may be reached at bgould@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @BrandonGouldHSLike NJ.com HS sports on Facebook.


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    The results of the Rutgers Center for State Health Policy poll might surprise you.


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    There's also a photo of O.J. Simpson in the white Bronco, signed by friend and driver Al Cowlings.


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    The girl claims she suffered permanent facial scarring as a result of the attack.

    The Pennsauken school district paid a $500,000 settlement to a girl who claimed another student assaulted her on a school bus and left her with permanent scarring on her face, according to court documents. 

    The alleged attack took place on June 19, 2014, when a student identified in court documents as S.C.A. attacked another identified as D.O. with a bladed weapon. The two were on a school bus parked at Pennsauken High School, waiting to depart the campus at the end of the day. 

    The settlement, dated June 15, 2017, was obtained by open records government advocate John Paff, who runs the blog NJ Civil Settlements

    The original suit filed January 2016 states that school administrators knew S.C.A. had attacked D.O. previously, and that D.O. feared another "unprovoked" attack may take place. Still, administrators allegedly ignored her requests for protection and alternate transportation to school.  

    The suit named the high school, district, board of education, Safety Bus Company former Principal Tameka Matthews and then-Assistant Principal Thomas Honeyman, who is now principal at Phifer Middler School. 

    As a result of the slashing, she suffered "life-altering, permanent physical injuries," as well as pain, suffering and psychological and emotional damages that included grief, anguish, torment, feelings of isolation, alienation, a loss of self-esteem, fear and frustration, according to the claim. 

    She also spent "great sums of money to treat her injuries, and suffered a profound loss of enjoyment of life," the suit states. 

    In early 2016, the Courier-Post reported that S.C.A. had sued as well, claiming that D.O. was a "ringleader" of bullies who tormented S.C.A., a minority who was not fluent in English and had "significant disabilities."

    S.C.A. reportedly claimed that D.O. had threatened to hurt her on the school bus, and that her parents had sought homeschool options after administrators failed to address the harassment. 

    The Pennsuaken Board of Education did not immediately return a request for comment on the suits and settlement. 

     Amanda Hoover can be reached at ahoover@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Twitter @amandahoovernj. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

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