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Breaking news & local stories from Camden City, Berlin, Laurel Springs and more

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    Two $150,000 tickets and 4 more worth $50,000 were purchased in for Saturday's drawing. Here's where they were sold Watch video

    While the $315 million Powerball ticket sold in New Jersey was by the far biggest lottery prize won in New Jersey this weekend, six other tickets sold in the state are worth a combined half-million dollars.

    Two tickets worth $150,000 and four more worth $50,000 were also purchased from retailers across the state this weekend, lottery officials said Monday.

    All six matched four numbers plus the Powerball with the holders of the $150,000 tickets getting the bigger prizes because both dropped an extra $1 to exercise the Power Play option.

    Mega Millions $533M jackpot winner from N.J. claims historic prize

    The $150,000 tickets were sold at Quick Convenience on Woodbridge Avenue in Edison and Speedy Mart on Johnson Drive in Watchung.

    The $50,000 tickets were purchased at the following locations:

    • BP gas station on Route 46 in Lodi
    • mini-mart on Park Avenue in Rutherford
    • 7-Eleven on Route 73 in Voorhees
    • Acme on East Main Street in Denville

    Saturday's winning numbers were 3, 6, 9, 17 and 56. The Power Ball was 25 with a multiplier of 3x. The odds of a $2 ticket matching four numbers and the Powerball are about 913,129 to 1. 

    The jackpot winning ticket was sold at ShopRite in Hackensack.

    Powerball is played in 44 states, Washington D.C, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. 

    The top prize for Wednesday's Powerball drawing resets to $40 million. Tuesday's Mega Millions jackpot is $60 million wit a cash option of $34 million. 

    Jeff Goldman may be reached at jeff_goldman@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @JeffSGoldman. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

     

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    Eagles rookies took their swings during a batting challenge at Citizens Bank Park, home of the Philadelphia Phillies, on Monday, May 21, 2018 (5/21/18). They were joined by head coach Doug Pederson.


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    Highlights of the first round of states.


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    See the May 22nd edition of the girls lacrosse Top 20.


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    The 40-year-old from Camden County pleaded guilty to vehicular manslaughter

    A New Jersey man admitted Monday he was under the influence of pot and methamphetamine during a crash that killed his passenger in Pemberton Township nearly two years ago.

    randolph.jpgJohn P. Randolph (Burlington County Prosecutor's Office) 

    John P. Randolph, 40, of the Atco section of Waterford, pleaded guilty to vehicular manslaughter, the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office sad in a statement. 

    The crash occurred around 6 a.m. on Sept. 27, 2016 when Randolph's car left the road and struck a tree. The passenger,  Dennis M. McCaffrey Jr., 39, was pronounced dead when emergency responders arrived near Hanover Boulevard and Magnolia Street in the Browns Mills section of town.

    Randolph was still seated behind the wheel. Blood tests revealed he was under the influence of marijuana, amphetamine and methamphetamine.

    He is scheduled to be sentenced Sept. 14. 

    Jeff Goldman may be reached at jeff_goldman@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @JeffSGoldman. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     


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    Find out who NJ Advance Media thinks will make it to the sectional finals.


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    Highlighting all the best action from the state tournament so far.


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    Doubles, triples and even a quadruple gold winner highlighted some great performances at the 2018 track and field county championships.


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    Pope Francis has said that Catholics who are homosexual, confused about their sexuality or convinced they were born in the wrong body deserve the same attentive pastoral care as anyone else. That is advise officials at Camden Catholic should take to heart.

    All is not well on the campus of Camden Catholic High School in Cherry Hill. Several reports of racism and bias have come to light that have given the parochial school a black eye.

    In one instance, the N-word was etched into a bench in the boys' locker room, according to the parent of a student who was standout player on Camden Catholic's 2013 football team. That parent, who referees high school basketball games, said the racial climate at the school is so bad that she refuses to referee games there.

    In another case, two parents of black girls on the school's 2016-17 basketball team said a white player made a racially insensitive comment to their daughters, igniting a protest outside the school.

    Earlier this year, a former Camden Catholic student was expelled from the University of Alabama after videos of her spouting racist language on Martin Luther King Jr. Day went viral.

    More recently, a big flap occurred when the school fired football coach Nick Strom and put him on administrative leave from his history teaching position late last month. Strom claims he was fired because he had too many black players on the team.

    Camden Catholic officials strongly denied allegations of racism. School President Mary Whipkey said Strom's "priorities for football became bigger than his priorities for teaching."

    Camden Catholic football coach retains lawyer, explores options

    School officials point with pride to the diversity of the school, which has about 780 students, 40 percent of whom are minority students.

    "We are a diverse school, so a diverse school is going to lead to things that other schools don't deal with," Whipkey said.

    A review by the Diocese of Camden's Office of Schools determined administrators at the school properly handled the issue involving the basketball players and took appropriate disciplinary action.

    But the fact that two sides can see the situation in starkly different ways indicates that something is wrong.

    Even if there is merely a perception of racism at Camden Catholic, the school should be taking forceful action to reinforce the Christian values it champions and denounce racism in all its forms. What we are seeing now is a defensive posture from school officials.

    Camden Catholic also faced a barrage of criticism over the firing of softball coach Jillian Mulderig, who was told to leave in July 2016 when school officials learned she intended to marry another woman.

    Mulderig, who did not teach at the school, said officials knew she was gay when she was hired to coach. But when a recording of her proposing to her girlfriend was posted to YouTube, she was fired.

    "I remember feeling so nauseous," Mulderig said.

    Shortly after Mulderig's firing, Camden Catholic made headlines again in September 2016 when it rescinded admission to a transgender student who was accepted to the school as a female and later transitioned to male.

    But as a religious institution that opposes same-sex marriage and gender reassignment on moral grounds, Catholic schools have the right to require that teachers and coaches practice what it preaches.

    Yet, in an age when gays and transgender people have won hard-fought battles for recognition and acceptance and the same rights accorded to other individuals, one has to feel compassion for Mulderig and others who are told they are not welcome.

    These are issues the church and society are grappling with. Pope Francis has said that Catholics who are homosexual, confused about their sexuality or convinced they were born in the wrong body deserve the same attentive pastoral care as anyone else.

    That is advise officials at Camden Catholic should take to heart.

    Bookmark NJ.com/Opinion. Follow on Twitter @NJ_Opinion and find NJ.com Opinion on Facebook.


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    NJ.com's latest rankings.


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    Several teams moved into this week's S.J Top 20 rankings.


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    Lauren Petroski believes the governor is stalling on adopting fixes to a funding formula.

    It's been more than a month since Gov. Phil Murphy told parents at a town hall meeting that he will work with the Legislature to find solutions to how state school aid is distributed. Since then, he has repeated that response whenever confronted about this issue. 

    Even the acting state education commissioner that Murphy named, Lamont Repollet, told the Senate Budget Committee that the Department of Education is open to "modernizing" the school funding formula.

    Yet, here we are with nothing to show for it. School boards have either adopted or are close to adopting their budgets with no news on how much school aid they can expect. It is a very serous issue, and Murphy saying that he will work with the Legislature does not show he is actually fixing the problem. If he is serious, he would immediately accept the full recommendations from state Senate President Stephen Sweeney, D-Gloucester, which were partly implemented in the current state budget year.

    How hard is it to review what has already been done, make some tweaks if necessary, and move forward? 

    The state-revenue-neutral portions of Sweeney's reforms are actually simple: eliminate caps on additional aid for fast-growing districts, phase out over a reasonable period "adjustment aid" still received by districts that have lost enrollment, and allow school boards to increase budgets beyond a 2 percent spending cap, if necessary, without seeking voter approval. These things that need to happen and they could have been hammered out within the past month. 

    There is no good reason for the governor to continue stalling on this.

    Lauren Petroski, Deptford Township

    Editor's note: The deadline to adopt a 2018-2019 state budget is July 1. 

    '1776' prom controversy 'contrived'

    Concerning the South Jersey Times' editorial, "It's no offense to ask all to party like it's 1776," published on May 22: 

    Thank you for the common sense rebuttal of a contrived and illogical controversy. 

    (The editorial stated that the Cherry Hill High School East principal did not to apologize for including the phrase "Party Like It's 1776" on tickets for a prom. Because of slavery at that time, some said the phrase is offensive to African Americans.)

    Warren Cherry, Baltimore, Md.

    Send a letter to the editor of South Jersey Times at sjletters@njadvancemedia.com

    Bookmark NJ.com/Opinion. Follow on Twitter @NJ_Opinion and find NJ.com Opinion on Facebook.


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    Where do you need to be for Thursday's quarterfinals?


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    Camden Catholic High School students celebrated their prom on Wednesday night at The Merion, dancing the night away.

    It was a night to remember for Camden Catholic High School students as they celebrated their senior prom at The Merion in Cinnaminson on Wednesday night.

    Prom-goers arrived dressed to the nines as they socialized, posed for photos and danced the night away.

    Check back at nj.com/south for other local high school prom coverage. And be sure to check out our complete prom coverage at nj.com/prom.

    BUY THESE PHOTOS
    Are you one of the people pictured at this prom? Want to buy the photo and keep it forever? Look for the blue link "buy photo" below the photographer's credit to purchase the picture. You'll have the ability to order prints in a variety of sizes, or products like magnets, keychains, coffee mugs and more.

    Tim Hawk may be reached at thawk@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Instagram @photog_hawk and Twitter @photogthawk. Find NJ.com on Facebook. Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips.


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    A day to honor our fallen heroes dates back 150 years.

    It began as Decoration Day and is now known as Memorial Day. By either name, it is dedicated to honoring the men and women who died while serving in the U.S. military.

    memorial-day-2014026-haddonfield.JPGAn early-1900s photo of two Civil War veterans laying flowers on soldiers' graves in Haddonfield. 

    The Civil War, which ended in 1865, claimed more lives than any conflict in U.S. history and required the establishment of the country's first national cemeteries. History.com notes that "by the late 1860s, Americans in various towns and cities had begun holding springtime tributes to these countless fallen soldiers, decorating their graves with flowers and reciting prayers."

    On May 5, 1868, Gen. John A. Logan, leader of an organization for Northern Civil War veterans, called for a nationwide day of remembrance later that month. The date of Decoration Day, as he called it, was chosen because it wasn't the anniversary of any particular battle.

    MORE: Vintage photos around New Jersey

    Memorial Day, as Decoration Day gradually came to be known, originally honored only those lost while fighting in the Civil War. But during World War I the holiday evolved to commemorate American military personnel who died in all wars.

    "For decades, Memorial Day continued to be observed on May 30, the date Logan had selected for the first Decoration Day," notes the website. "But in 1968 Congress passed the Uniform Monday Holiday Act, which established Memorial Day as the last Monday in May in order to create a three-day weekend for federal employees; the change went into effect in 1971. The same law also declared Memorial Day a federal holiday."

    While not commonly known, each year on Memorial Day a national moment of remembrance takes place at 3:00 p.m. local time. Take a moment this year - that moment, perhaps - to pay your personal tribute to those who gave their lives for our freedom.

    Here is a gallery of past Memorial Day parades and tributes from New Jersey, and links to other galleries.

    Vintage photos of Medal of Honor recipients from N.J.

    Vintage N.J. photos of Memorial Day

    Vintage photos of American pride in N.J.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    Analysis and previews ahead of each girls lacrosse sectional final.


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    He handed demand notes to tellers in Haddon Township and Haddon Heights, the county prosecutor's office said.

    A man accused of robbing two Camden County banks in the past week was arrested Wednesday after authorities found him at a convenience store in Philadelphia.

    David Walker, 40, of Collingswood, passed notes demanding money to tellers at a TD Bank in Haddon Heights and a Wells Fargo Bank in Haddon Township, the Camden County Prosecutor's Office said in a news release.

    On May 18, he was at the TD Bank on the White Horse Pike in Haddon Heights just before 6 p.m., wearing a black beanie and other dark clothing. After getting money from the teller, he fled in a silver Scion.

    Then on Monday, he was at the Wells Fargo on Cuthbert Boulevard in Haddon Township, this time in more professional wear, the prosecutor's office said.

    The amounts of money handed over in each incident were not disclosed.

    After receiving tips that Walker might be in Philadelphia, members of the NY/NJ Regional Fugitive Task Force, along with the U.S. Marshals Service, arrested Walker around 1 p.m. at a Royal Farms on Aramingo Avenue, a spokesman said.

    Walker was taken into custody without incident and has been charged with two counts of robbery.

    Joe Brandt can be reached at jbrandt@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @JBrandt_NJ. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

    Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips

     

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    Juan Sanes fired at a woman's car while she was in a shootout and car chase with two men in a pickup truck

    A convicted sex offender who fired 17 shots at a woman's car in an attempt to kill her will be going to prison for a long time.

    Last week, a judge in Camden sentenced Juan Sanes, 44, to 50 years in prison after a jury found him guilty of conspiracy to commit murder, five counts of aggravated assault and weapons offenses related to the shooting more than five years ago, the Camden County Prosecutor's Office said.

    It all started on May 5, 2013, when two men in a Dodge Ram truck went after a then-23-year-old woman and her 2-year-old daughter while they visited a water ice stand at 29th Street and Pierce Avenue. She had two other passengers.

    The men pulled up in the truck beside the woman's Buick in an attempt to block her before getting out wielding baseball bats. The woman shifted into reverse and tried to escape.

    The men in the Dodge chased (and were later chased by) the Buick, as they and the woman shot at each other while driving through the city's Cramer Hill section.

    During the shootout and chase, one of the men in the Dodge called Sanes and devised a plan to continue the chase near Sanes, so he could shoot at the woman. Sanes used a clothing donation bin on 32nd Street and Pierce Avenue as cover; when the Buick passed, he jumped out and fired at it.

    Of his 17 shots, one hit the woman's hand and another grazed her head. She survived. The daughter and passengers were not hit.

    Sanes must serve 42 years of his sentence before being eligible for parole.

    Sanes registered as a sex offender after a 1997 conviction for endangering the welfare of a child, State Police records show.

    Joe Brandt can be reached at jbrandt@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @JBrandt_NJ. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

    Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips 


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    After two months of games and much consideration, NJ.com introduces the 18 high school players under consideration for the 2018 Player of the Year Award.


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    Camden High School students celebrated their prom on Thursday night at the Crowne Plaza, dancing the night away.

    It was a night to remember for Camden High School students as they celebrated their prom at the Crowne Plaza in Cherry Hill on Thursday night.

    Prom-goers arrived in style as they socialized, posed for photos and danced the night away.

    Check back at nj.com/south for other local high school prom coverage. And be sure to check out our complete prom coverage at nj.com/prom.

    BUY THESE PHOTOS
    Are you one of the people pictured at this prom? Want to buy the photo and keep it forever? Look for the blue link "buy photo" below the photographer's credit to purchase the picture. You'll have the ability to order prints in a variety of sizes, or products like magnets, keychains, coffee mugs and more.

    Lori M. Nichols may be reached at lnichols@njadvancemedia.com. Follow her on Instagram @photog_lori and Twitter @photoglori. Find NJ.com on FacebookHave a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips.


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