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Breaking news & local stories from Camden City, Berlin, Laurel Springs and more

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    At the moment, when it comes to fake photos, we have a lot more problems than solutions.

    Remember the computer acronym WYSIWYG -- what you see is what you get? In this gallery, the pictures may cause the viewer to do a double-take, but I assure you that they are WYSIWYG photos. That is, no computer program was used to alter the images; the pictures depict what was seen through the camera's lens. 

    Writing in "Photo Tampering Through History," Hany Farid notes that the practice of tampering with photos began not long after the creation of the first photograph. Early photographers employed double-exposures and alterations to negatives to achieve results that most people accepted at face value. Examples of this include spirit photographs from the 19th century which purported to show ghosts and spirits but were double exposures.

    new jersey.jpgThis one is, of course, is completely real. 

    When computer technology allowed for photos to be digitalized and opened with software such as Photoshop, the likelihood that a photo might not be what it appears to be increased by leaps and bounds ... and our ability to notice doesn't appear to have kept up. A Washington Post article by William Wan from July 2017 notes that Sophie Nightingale, who researches cognitive psychology at the University of Warwick in England, thinks our ability to spot faked photos is "not good at all."

    In a test designed by Nightingale and taken by more than 700 men and women, participants could tell an image was faked only 60 percent of the time -- a little better than if they guessed completely at random. And with the correct picks, only 45 percent of participants could pinpoint what had been changed in a photo. Men were slightly more adept at finding the specific change.

    MORE: Vintage photos around New Jersey

    "Many feel we should be more aware of fake photos," said Nightingale who is especially worried about the implications of fake photos in court, where images are often used as evidence. "But if you just go around telling people don't trust anything, then people will lose all faith in images, which is equally problematic. At the moment, when it comes to fake photos, we have a lot more problems than solutions, I'm afraid."

    So, enjoy this collection of WYSIWYG photos. And, here are links to other galleries you might like.

    Vintage N.J. photos that deserve a second look 2015

    Vintage N.J. photos that deserve a second look 2014

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    A look at the sectional semifinals.

    The first round of the NJSIAA football playoffs are in the books, and the sectional semifinals are upon us. NJ.com has you covered with wall-to-wall coverage throughout the tournament, and that continues with sectional semifinal previews and picks.

    Below you will find the previews for all 23 playoff sections and their sectional semifinals.

    Completed previews are linked below.

    SECTION SEMIFINAL PREVIEWS 
    North 1: Group 1 | Group 2 | Group 3 | Group 4 | Group 5
    North 2: Group 1 | Group 2 | Group 3 | Group 4 | Group 5

    Central: Group 1 | Group 2 | Group 3 | Group 4 | Group 5
    South: Group 1 | Group 2 | Group 3 | Group 4 | Group 5
    Non-Public: Group 2 | Group 3 | Group 4

    Jeremy Schneider may be reached at jschneider@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @J_Schneider. Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    The Top 20 gets one last twist before the state finals on Saturday.


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    The sign is on a South Jersey billboard.

    A South Jersey gun club's billboard depicting a kneeling person aiming a rifle with the slogan "The only time we take a knee" has drawn criticism for mocking the ongoing national anthem protests involving NFL players.

    A driver tweeted a picture of the South Jersey Shooting Club billboard Monday and a debate on social media ensued along with calls to have the advertisement removed. 

    "Tell them this billboard is racist," MoNeke Ragsdale said on Twitter. "Taking a knee is a protest to say NO to police brutality."

    Ragsdale, a member of South Jersey Women for Progressive Change, urged people to call the club and demand the sign be removed.

    Bar boycotts NFL in support of Veterans Day

    "I think it mocks and disrespects people taking a knee to protest police brutality," said Meredith Meisenheimer, a SJWPC member. "The intent is to move the debate away from police brutality, particularly for people of color, and try to center the discussion around patriotism."

    Meisenheimer said her group has more than 8,000 members on a private Facebook page and was formed "shortly after election 2016 by a small group of woman friends horrified by the election results to work to change politics for the better."

    A request for comment Wednesday from South Jersey Shooting Club, the Winslow Township gun range advertised on the sign, was not returned. The billboard has been displayed along Route 73 in Voorhees and near routes 73 and 130 in Pennsauken.

    Wesley Aducat, a man identified as the owner of the gun club, told Philly.com the billboard "has absolutely nothing to do with race. It's just support for our veterans." 

    Darnell Hardwick, president of the Camden County NAACP, isn't buying Aducat's claim. He said he's a veteran and the sign doesn't represent him.

    "I served in the military and that's part of what we fought for, for people to have those freedoms," Hardwick said. 

    Meisenheimer and Hardwick said they both supported the gun club's First Amendment right to express their thoughts on the sign, but thought its members should also respect the right of the players to take a knee in protest.

    Hardwick said President Donald Trump inflamed the issue after he goaded NFL owners in tweets to "stop disrespecting our Flag & Country, " and to demanded they "Get that son of a bitch off the field right now," if a player knelt.

    "It wasn't a big problem until Trump became president," Hardwick said. "All this is doing is taking away an issue of social injustice and making it something it's not."

    Bill Duhart may be reached at bduhart@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @bduhart. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

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    A group of alumni and parents want to stop demolition of Camden High School.

    An attorney for a group opposed to the demolition of 101-year-old Camden High School is vowing to continue legal action after a federal court ruling Thursday.

    The court ruled no federal rights were being infringed upon by the decision of the state and state-run Camden City schools to demolish the school and rebuild a new facility on the same site at Baird and Park boulevards.

    But Matthew Litt, an attorney for alumni and parent groups who want to preserve some or all of the school in the new design, said he plans to continue litigation. That action will include a request for a new injunction to block demolition, which was schedule to begin in September.

    "This is frustrating," Litt said. "The plaintiff and defendants should never have been adversaries."

    Litt said his clients are not necessarily trying to stop a project to build a new, state-of-the-art high school to replace the deteriorating century-old "Castle on the Hill." But they want officials to explore incorporating part of the old facade into the new school.

    "The history of that building, it's profound, and I care a lot about it," Camden Superintendent Paymon Rouhanifard told NJ.com earlier this year. "We simply can't put adult nostalgia over the needs of children."

    Litt said the high school was added to the state register of historic places earlier this year. He said that designation means any process for demolishing it must meet a stringent review process that school officials have not met.

    Bill Duhart may be reached at bduhart@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @bduhart. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

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    School districts still haven't turned an appropriate ear toward credible allegations of bullying that students or their families report. That's costing New Jersey in several ways.

    South Jersey school boards and administrators should look closely at a pair of legal settlements disclosed in the past two weeks in which families of students who were bullied received six-figure payouts.

    Just announced was a $500,000 judgement from the Pennsauken school district in a 2014 case where one girl had slashed another in the face with a blade while both were aboard a school bus. The other young woman involved -- the so-called slasher -- has also sued the district. 

    About two weeks ago, it was revealed that a fourth-grader who alleged bullying to the point where she suffered severe anxiety will receive $100,000 from the Brooklawn public schools. The victim's mother filed the litigation in 2015. The plaintiffs claimed that even though the girl had been prescribed anti-anxiety medication as a result of the incidents, the school nurse refused to administer the medication during school hours.

    Yes, we know the districts carry insurance. Neither of these cases went to trial, so we can't say for sure if juries would have found the schools (and some administrators and teachers who were also named) liable. But the the lawsuit narratives are similar, suggesting that school personnel minimized or ignored approaches by the families to do something about patterns of bullying they reported.

    That's what gets school districts in trouble. While their ability to prevent random, unprovoked attacks between students is limited, parents and students who report ongoing problems need to hear a response that is more than a shrug or an admonition to "suck it up."

    New Jersey has been a leader on the school anti-bullying front. It was one of the first states to enact an anti-bullying law, in 2002. In 2010, it created an "Anti-Bullying Bill of Rights," listing specific responsibilities for school districts to report harassment and bullying, and to implement anti-bullying curricula for students.

    What's scary is that the situations cited above both took place in 2014. Pennsauken apparently faces another unrelated bullying-related lawsuit from the same year. That's well after the "bill of rights" took effect in January 2011.

    The stakes, both for the victims and the school districts' bottom lines, have since become higher. Earlier this year, a $375,000 settlement was reached in a case filed against the Bayonne schools, in which it was asserted that the severely injured high school victim had been harassed and bullied -- along with other students who were originally from Egypt.

    Recent reports of bias incidents among students at sites like Washington Township High School and the Gloucester County Institute of Technology have not led directly to any bullying lawsuits, but they highlight the tense atmosphere fostered by what some people believe is unlimited license to engage in racial and ethnic slurs during these superheated political times.

    School districts may be doing a good job filing reports with the state and exposing students to programs that promote respect for all. But gold-star compliance with state rules is not sufficient. When confronted with specific "HIB" -- harassment, intimidation, bullying" -- accusations, they need to offer solutions, not just rudimentary acknowledgement. 

    Perpetrators can be disciplined. Repeated victims can be offered alternate school or transportation options. Get on top of these cases before they morph into severe injuries, long-term psychological damage and expensive payouts. 

    Send a letter to the editor of South Jersey Times at sjletters@njadvancemedia.com

    Bookmark NJ.com/Opinion. Follow on Twitter @NJ_Opinion and find NJ.com Opinion on Facebook.


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    This is the seventh year the event is being held.

    Three renowned chefs including Chef Timothy Witcher, winner of Food Network's "Chopped," will join members and volunteers of The Perfecting Church to provide a "taste" of The Perfect Thanksgiving by serving up a five-star dining experience accompanied by live performed by 7Electricity.

    After dining sufficiently, guests will leave with "to-go" bags full of recipes and groceries to make their own  Perfect Thanksgiving meal.

    Now in its seventh year, The Perfect Thanksgiving is an anchor activity of Loving Our Cities with a mission to provide a memorable dining experience and food for our neighbors at risk of dining alone or not at all, while granting volunteers the opportunity to give back and positively impact the lives of others with their time and talents.

    The event will take place on Nov. 18 from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at Winslow Township School #3.

    Have community news you'd like to share? Send an email to sjtowns@njadvancemedia.com. Have an event happening you want to share? Go to nj.com/events to submit your information to be included in a community calendar. 

     

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    Find all the previews and picks for the state football semifinals with the NJ.com mega-coverage guide

    ESSENTIALS 
     LIVE updates, results and links for sectional semifinals
    Complete, statewide semifinals schedule
    • Statewide stat leaders for Week 10 of the HS football season
     Football playoffs 2017: Results and links for Round 1 games
     
    Statewide conference football standings
     Updated 2017 NJSIAA football state tournament brackets


    SECTION SEMIFINAL PREVIEWS/PICKS
     North 1: Group 1 | Group 2 | Group 3 | Group 4 | Group 5
     North 2: Group 1 | Group 2 | Group 3 | Group 4 | Group 5
     Central: Group 1 | Group 2 | Group 3 | Group 4 | Group 5
    South:  Group 1 | Group 2 | Group 3 | Group 4 | Group 5
    • Non-Public: Group 2 | Group 3 | Group 4


    RANKINGS 
    Top 20
    • Group and conference

    MUST-READ CONTENT 
    • 
    14 bold predictions for sectional semifinal weekend
    • 21 football players in the 20-touchdown club
    Are concussions up or down in N.J. football? Why nobody can answer that question
    • The top 30 performances from the football quarterfinals
    • Transgender policy gets overhaul by state athletic association
    • Voorhees, North Hunterdon football gearing for NJSIAA playoff semifinals
    • "Unsung Heroes" honored from Times of Trenton area football teams
    • The 12th Man TD Club of Trenton announces weekly football honors (Week 10)
    • South Jersey Touchdown Club honors Players of the Week, West Deptford's Paratore feels he belongs
    • Hot takes from Round 1 of the football playoffs: Thrillers, blowouts and upsets
    • From Asbury Park to zero-win teams: A-to-Z guide to the playoffs

    RECRUITING 
    • Rutgers offers preferred walk-on opportunity to South Jersey specialist Zachary Sterr
    • How does Jaaron Hayek, Rutgers' newest commit, compare to his 2 brothers?
    • DePaul 3-star OL Khris Banks being patient in deciding his 2nd time around
    • What have N.J.'s top 50 high school football recruits been up to?

    Joe Zedalis may be reached at jzedalis@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @josephzedalis. Like NJ.com HS sports on Facebook.


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    The incident occurred shortly after 1 a.m.

    A 70-year-old Deptford man was killed in a three-vehicle accident in Pennsauken on Friday, police said.

    Rocco Lombardo died in the wreck on Route 130 N. near an intersection with Route 38 reported at 1:03 a.m.

    "Speed was definitely a factor," said township police Sgt. Chris Sulzbach. "We're not ruling out a medical emergency and we're still waiting on toxicology." 

    One person was treated and released from Cooper University Hospital in Camden afterward.

    Lombardo's 2017 Honda Accord plowed into the rear of two cars stopped at a traffic light, Sulzbach said.

    The busy six-lane, divided highway was closed northbound for four hours, police said.

    Bill Duhart may be reached at bduhart@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @bduhart. Find NJ.com on Facebook.
     

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    The graduating class represents 19 of New Jersey's 21 counties. Watch video

    The New Jersey Department of Corrections (DOC) swore in 147 new officers Friday morning and Jynette Hernandez, was elected class president.

    Lt. Governor Kim Guadagno, who has attended 19 of 21 graduations since taking office, told the trainees-turned-officers: "Your families are supporting you. Someone should say thank you for that. I'm here to do it."

    Guadagno reminded them that they are now part of another family. "That's the family of those that wear the blue uniform. She encouraged them to "be loyal to each other, to listen to each other, to have each other's back."

    DOC Commissioner Gary M. Lanigan administered the oath of office to the new officers, Class 241.

    Class 241 represents 19 of New Jersey's 21 counties.

    The class includes 11 individuals who have served in the military, as well as 32 who come from law-enforcement families and 56 members of Class 241 have a college degree.

    Michael Mancuso may be reached at mmancuso@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @michaelmancuso Find NJ.com on Facebook.


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    All the news and information on the playoff semifinals in one place.

     ESSENTIALS 
    •  Brackets for all 23 sections  
     Round 2 mega-coverage guide 
    • Previews, picks for all Round 2 games  
     NJ.com football Top 20, Nov. 12: New teams burst in after Round 1 
    • Championship games schedule, locations, dates and times (matchups TBD)

    ROUND 1 RECAP
    • Results and links for Round 1 games
    • Hot takes from Round 1: Thrillers, blowouts and upsets
     The top 30 performances from the football quarterfinals

    PLAYOFF PREVIEWS
     Bracket-by-bracket previews  
    • An A-to-Z guide to the playoffs
    • Predicting all 23 sectional champions
    • Dark horses: 19 dangerous low seeds 
     35 players worth the price of admission 

    ALSO: Top photos from semifinals

    FRIDAY'S FEATURED COVERAGE 
    STATE PLAYOFF SEMIFINALS

    NON-PUBLIC
    GROUP 4
    No. 2 St. Peter's Prep 42, Paramus Catholic 19
    Marauders book return trip to MetLife
     Look back at live updates
    Box score

    SOUTH JERSEY
    GROUP 5
    No. 10 Lenape 63, No. 19 Howell 28

    JoJo Kellum, Lenape run into final
    • 
    Photo gallery
     Look back at live updates
    Box score

    GROUP 3
    Delsea 41, No. 4 Timber Creek 30

    Rally ends 25-game winning streak
    • 
    Photo gallery
     Look back at live updates
    • Box score

    CENTRAL JERSEY
    GROUP 5
    No. 20 South Brunswick 21, Old Bridge 10

    Justin Shorter provides points on both sides of ball
    • 
    Photo gallery
     Look back at live updates
    Box score

    NORTH JERSEY, SECTION 1
    GROUP 5
    Union City 35, Bloomfield 0

    Union City finally breaks through to final
    • 
    Photo gallery
     Look back at live updates
    Box score

    GROUP 4
    Mount Olive 21, West Morris 16

    Turnaround leads to title game
    • 
    Photo gallery
    • Look back at live updates
    Box score

    GROUP 1
    Shabazz 27, Roselle Park 6

    Showdown set up with Weequahic
    Box score

    NORTH JERSEY, SECTION 2
    GROUP 4

    No. 13 Phillipsburg 21, Irvington 20

    Stateliners survive on missed 2-pointer
    • 
    Photo gallery
    Box score

    GROUP 4
    No. 18 North Hunterdon 29, Sayreville 7

    Lions closer to 1st title in 42 years
    • 
    Photo gallery
    Box score

    GROUP 3
    West Essex 28, Rahway 14

    Resilient Knights win 9th straight
    • 
    Photo gallery
    Box score

    GROUP 3
    Voorhees 24, Parsippany Hills 19

    Last-second drive dies at 1-yard line
    Box score

    GROUP 2
    Hackettstown 47, Caldwell 27

    Christian Maciak had 3 picks, scores 2 TDs
    • 
    Photo gallery
    Box score

    CENTRAL JERSEY
    GROUP 4
    Freehold Borough 35, Brick Township 28

    Ashante Worthy gets his revenge
    Box score

    GROUP 2
    Point Pleasant Boro 27, Manasquan 6

    Cipriano runs, receptions add up to 4 TDs
    Box score

    GROUP 1
    Middlesex 41, Burlington City 20

    Ground game churns out 6 TDs
    Box score

    SOUTH JERSEY
    GROUP 5
    Rancocas Valley 15, Millville 14
    RV overcomes 14-0 deficit
    Box score

    GROUP 4
    Hammonton 27, Highland 21, OT
    Six seed knocks off seven in see-saw affair
    •  Photo gallery
    Box score

    GROUP 2
    West Deptford 28, Cedar Creek 20 
    Blocked PAT, Gismondi's 2 late INTs seal it
    Box score

    TOP 20 SCOREBOARD
    No. 2 St. Peter's Prep 42, Paramus Catholic 19
    Delsea 41, No. 4 Timber Creek 30
     No. 17 Rancocas Valley 15, No. 5 Millville 14
    No. 6 Manalapan 63, Freehold Township 22
    No. 7 DePaul 42, No. 14 St. John Vianney 21
    No. 10 Lenape 63, No. 19 Howell 28
    No. 12 Old Tappan 42, Wayne Hills 7
    No. 13 Phillipsburg 21, Irvington 20
    Mater Dei 35, No. 16 Holy Spirit 34
    No. 18 North Hunterdon 29, Sayreville 7
    No. 20 South Brunswick 21, Old Bridge 10

    SATURDAY LIVE COVERAGE
    • No. 1 Bergen Catholic vs. Delbarton, 1
    No. 3 St. Joseph (Mont.) at No. 9 Pope John, 1
    No. 8 Montclair vs. Ridgewood, 1
    No. 11 Westfield vs. Elizabeth, 1
    • Bridgewater-Raritan at Piscataway, 1
    • Haddonfield vs. Cinnaminson, 1
    • Gateway at Penns Grove, 1

    SATURDAY'S FEATURED COVERAGE 
    No. 1 Bergen Catholic vs. Delbarton, 1
    • Live updates
    • Box score

    No. 3 St. Joseph (Mont.) at No. 9 Pope John, 1
    Live updates
    •  Photo gallery
     Box score

    No. 8 Montclair vs. Ridgewood, 1
     Live updates
    •  Photo gallery
     Box score

    No. 11 Westfield vs. Elizabeth, 1
    •  Live updates
    •  Photo gallery
     Box score

    Bridgewater-Raritan at Piscataway, 1
     Live updates
    •  Photo gallery
     Box score

    Haddonfield vs. Cinnaminson at Cherry Hill West, 1
    • Live updates
    •  Photo gallery
    • Box score

    Gateway at Penns Grove, 1
     Live updates
    •  Photo gallery
     Box score

    TOP 20 SCOREBOARD
    • No. 1 Bergen Catholic vs. Delbarton, 1
    • No. 3 St. Joseph (Mont.) at No. 9 Pope John, 1
    • No. 8 Montclair vs. Ridgewood, 1
    • No. 11 Westfield vs. Elizabeth, 1
    • No. 15 St. Joseph (Hamm.) vs. Immaculata, 1

    PLAYOFF SCOREBOARDS
    Non-Public, Group 4 

    Non-Public, Group 3  

    Non-Public, Group 2 

    North Jersey, Section 1, Group 5

    North Jersey, Section 1, Group 4 

    North Jersey, Section 1, Group 3 

    North Jersey, Section 1, Group 2 

    North Jersey, Section 1, Group 1 

    North Jersey, Section 2, Group 5 

    North Jersey, Section 2, Group 4 

    North Jersey, Section 2, Group 3 

    North Jersey, Section 2, Group 2 

    North Jersey, Section 2, Group 1 

    Central Jersey, Group 5 

    Central Jersey, Group 4 

    Central Jersey, Group 3 

    Central Jersey, Group 2 

    Central Jersey, Group 1 

    South Jersey, Group 5 

    South Jersey, Group 4 

    South Jersey, Group 3 

    South Jersey, Group 2 

    South Jersey, Group 1 


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    Team and individual highlights from HS football semifinals weekend


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    Students at colleges across the state weren't getting enough to eat. Now, they have a new option.


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    Is it the urbanized 24/7 rat race that is so common in northern and central New Jersey that is stressing out our state's residents? Maybe not.

    Decry the great yoga studio shortage around these parts. There are few "new-age" storefronts compared to North Jersey, as well. And, not enough of us have been stocking up on "calming" teas when they're on sale at Whole Foods or even Walmart. 

    Come to think of it, there isn't a single Whole Foods location in the part of the state that a recent Rutgers University study tagged as "Southeastern New Jersey." What the great Southeast does have, however, is higher rates of stress than researchers found anywhere else in New Jersey. 

    Breaking out Atlantic, Salem, Cape May and Cumberland counties, and based on a 2016 survey, 23.8 percent of regional respondents said they had a "great deal" of stress, and 52.2 percent said they had "some" stress. The Southeastern percentage in each case was the highest among five New Jersey regions, as was the combined percentage (76.1 percent ) of "some" and "a great deal" stress responses.

    Let it be known that no part of New Jersey is stress-free. Its statewide "some stress" score of 44 percent is seven points above the national average. The lowest regional combined score in New Jersey was 64.7 percent, only about 11 percent lower than the Southeast section.

    Still, it surprised the Rutgers team that the counties in the state with the least traffic congestion, the lowest population density and, probably, the smallest overall property tax bills, would most need "Marcus Welby, M.D." actor Robert Young to come back from the dead and ask "Why so tense?" while hawking decaffeinated coffee on TV.

    But, there's a possible reason for stress gaps that didn't entirely escape the researchers: "It's people who say they have trouble paying their bills, even if they're not low-income," said Joel Cantor, director of the Rutgers Center for State Health Policy.

    Both "South" sections -- Gloucester County and north was labeled as "Southwestern" -- reported higher financially related stress than the other regions, Cantor added.

    In other words, the results of this survey track closely with other assessments of New Jersey on factors such as child health and poverty. Every year, in its annual "Kids Count" profiles, Advocates for Children of New Jersey (ACNJ) puts Cumberland, Cape May, Atlantic and Salem counties near the bottom of the 21-county ranking. This past July, Cumberland finished last, Cape May was 18th, Atlantic was 16th, and Salem was 15th. They were joined near the bottom with urbanized Camden, Essex and Passaic counties.

    Which counties did ACNJ rank best? Morris, followed by Hunterdon, Somerset and Bergen. All have average family incomes well above any South Jersey county's.

    There's probably a synergistic correlation between the studies' data. It stands to reason that counties in which youngsters' outcomes are most at risk would have the most adults who are worried -- stressed out -- about their kids. Some 70 percent of the Southeastern residents polled in the Rutgers survey attributed their stress to concern about a family member.

    Lack of access to jobs, to social safety net services and to convenient health care are all stress triggers, and maybe they're bigger ones than traffic jams or high crime rates. Sure, we can stop drinking so much Red Bull and start learning Transcendental Meditation techniques. To really move the regional stress needle, though, it will take a more equitable distribution of resources throughout our state.

    Send a letter to the editor of South Jersey Times at sjletters@njadvancemedia.com

    Bookmark NJ.com/Opinion. Follow on Twitter @NJ_Opinion and find NJ.com Opinion on Facebook.


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    It's the last poll of the year.

    It's the last poll of the year.


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    Dogs and cats throughout New Jersey await adoption in shelters and rescues.

    Pets Plus of Delran hosted a grand reopening on Nov. 19 to celebrate its transition from selling commercially-raised puppies to only offering rescued shelter dogs and puppies for adoption.

    The dogs will come from the Hub City Humane Society in Mississippi, Animal Aid USA and St. Hubert's Animal Welfare Center in New Jersey, Homeward Trails Animal Rescue in Virginia, the Humane Society of Raleigh County in West Virginia, the Heart of Louisiana Humane Society in Louisiana, Natchez-Adams County Humane Society in Mississippi, Oktibbeha County Humane Society and other shelter partners.

    The store will join more than 2,600 other pet stores around the country that have signed the Puppy Friendly Pet Stores pledge of The Humane Society of the United States, making it their official policy not to do business with puppy mills.

    The Pets Plus Natural pet store chain has converted all of its stores to the new humane model.

    "The Humane Society of the United States applauds Pets Plus of Delran for improving the community's pet adoption rate and taking a stand against inhumane puppy mills," said John Moyer, corporate outreach manager of the Stop Puppy Mills campaign for The HSUS.

    Pets Plus of Delran is located at 1321A Fairview Blvd.

    Greg Hatala may be reached at ghatala@starledger.com. Follow him on Twitter @GregHatala. Find Greg Hatala on Facebook.


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    Teams tumbled and two new teams entered.


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    The murder occurred near 28th Street in Camden in 2015.

    A 20-year-old Camden man has been sentenced to 45 years in jail for the fatal shooting of a man during a robbery in 2015, the Camden County Prosecutor said.

    Samuel Lopez must serve approximately 38 years and 4 months before he is eligible for parole. He was sentenced Friday for murder, robbery and weapons offenses for the killing of Jose Fanco, 34. Franco died the day after the shooting.

    The robbery occurred in Sept. 2015 near 28th Street and Pierce Avenue. Lopez was arrested in Florida three months after the homicide.

    Bill Duhart may be reached at bduhart@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @bduhart. Find NJ.com on Facebook.
     

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    Who stole the show in in the playoffs?


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    The driver of one of the vehicles is expected to be charged

    A 32-year-old woman was killed Sunday when an SUV rear-ended another vehicle, overturned and landed in a retention basin along the Atlantic City Expressway, authorities said.

    Jalina Steele, of Camden, was a passenger in the SUV. She was pronounced dead at a nearby hospital following the 8:47 p.m. crash at milepost 23.9 in Hammonton, State Police said. 

    Charges are pending against the driver of the Luis Cream, 35, of the Blackwood section of Gloucester Township, according to authorities.

    Busy travel week off to deadly start in N.J.

    Cream was driving west when his SUV hit the back of a minivan.

    The minivan spun and struck the guardrail before coming to a stop in the center lane. A 35-year-old woman driving the minivan and her 35-year-old passenger, both residents of the Sicklerville section of Winslow, were both treated for minor injuries. 

    Cream's SUV crashed through a guard rail, flipped and tumbled into the water. The severity of Cream's injuries was not immediately available, State Police said. 

    Jeff Goldman may be reached at jeff_goldman@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @JeffSGoldman. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

     

     

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